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Head Injuries in Canada: A Decade of Change (1994-1995 to 2003-2004)

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Pages: 31 File Details: (PDF) 350 KB
Date: Jul 31, 2009 Price A/B: Free
ISBN: NA Action: Download

Traumatic injuries are a substantial health problem that can have serious implications, with the potential of resulting in long-term disability or death. In fiscal 2003-2004 (April 1, 2003 to March 31, 2004), there were 194,771 hospitalizations due to trauma in Canada. These hospitalizations accounted for 1,918,860 days in hospital in 2003-2004. In 2003-2004 there were 6,857 injury cases that died in hospital, representing 4% of all injury hospitalizations for that year.

Traumatic head injury is often a devastating diagnosis with considerable public health implications, as well as serious personal and caregiver implications. Canadian researchers have begun to make strides in describing the population with traumatic head injuries,1, 2 but to date, there has been little in the way of a national picture to help to inform understanding of the mechanisms by which traumatic head injuries are sustained as well as the populations most at risk. There were 16,811 hospitalizations as a result of traumatic head injuries in 2003-2004.

This Analysis in Brief provides a description of the changing profile of head injury in Canada over the ten years between 1994-1995 and 2003-2004. It focuses on cycling as a cause of traumatic injury admission in Canada and provides a contextual framework for the other leading causes of head injury admission.

Series

National Trauma Registry Analysis in Brief

Contact

ntr@cihi.ca



© 1996-2017, Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI). All rights reserved.

Head Injuries in Canada: A Decade of Change (1994-1995 to 2003-2004)

Not Available

Language: Media Type:
Pages: 35 File Details: (PDF) 408 KB
Date: Aug 30, 2006 Price A/B: Free
ISBN: NA Action: Download

Traumatic injuries are a substantial health problem that can have serious implications, with the potential of resulting in long-term disability or death. In fiscal 2003-2004 (April 1, 2003 to March 31, 2004), there were 194,771 hospitalizations due to trauma in Canada. These hospitalizations accounted for 1,918,860 days in hospital in 2003-2004. In 2003-2004 there were 6,857 injury cases that died in hospital, representing 4% of all injury hospitalizations for that year.

Traumatic head injury is often a devastating diagnosis with considerable public health implications, as well as serious personal and caregiver implications. Canadian researchers have begun to make strides in describing the population with traumatic head injuries,1, 2 but to date, there has been little in the way of a national picture to help to inform understanding of the mechanisms by which traumatic head injuries are sustained as well as the populations most at risk. There were 16,811 hospitalizations as a result of traumatic head injuries in 2003-2004.

This Analysis in Brief provides a description of the changing profile of head injury in Canada over the ten years between 1994-1995 and 2003-2004. It focuses on cycling as a cause of traumatic injury admission in Canada and provides a contextual framework for the other leading causes of head injury admission.

Series

National Trauma Registry Analysis in Brief

Contact

ntr@cihi.ca



© 1996-2017, Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI). All rights reserved.

Head Injuries in Canada: A Decade of Change (1994-1995 to 2003-2004)

Not Available

Language: Media Type:
Pages: N/A File Details: N/A
Date: N/A Price A/B: N/A
ISBN: N/A Action: N/A

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Series

National Trauma Registry Analysis in Brief

Contact

ntr@cihi.ca



© 1996-2017, Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI). All rights reserved.

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